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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 10:24 am 
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Just this morning I have been alerted to a long comment posted in response to the blogpost I linked here two months ago.

It is full of insight and information. Those of you following the Tom Randall Orphanage case in the Philippines will want to read this. It is comment #11, posted on Nov. 23 by "Megan".

http://michaelnewnham.com/?p=19454

"Getting the truth out to prove that Tom Randall is not being honest is not easy because he is going to great efforts to cover it up. He is actually very motivated to lie as the truth will destroy him. To think that abuse has been going on in his orphanage for years, by the man whom he gave 100% power and trust to and by Toto’s son, whom Tom also views as a son. There was no system of checks and balances- Tom, Toto, and Jake were accountable to Tom, Toto, and Jake. At this point few have said things against Tom, just Toto and Jake. It’s not Tom’s character is question, it’s Toto and Jakes (and in my opinion, the character of all those who did stand silent and still are now) Those who strongly defend Tom should ask themselves if they know Toto and Jake well enough to vouch so strongly for them. It’s not ironic that the churches in the philippines have NOT come out in support of Toto, Jake, or Tom (with the exception of the few receiving huge amounts of money from Tom). The people of Lucena know Toto is a creep. That’s no secret. When numerous people, including victims, came to Tom for help, he silenced them. There were 5 victims ready to testify of abuse that day in court. Who is listening to them? Has any of Tom’s supported asked the victims who have escaped from the mission home what was really going on there? To find the truth, one must consider talking to people NOT on Tom’s pay role. Many are benefiting by keeping silent. Payment for silences is disguised as “donations to help the children and their families” and sometimes distributed the a local church in Lucena (yes, the pastor is in on it and also benefiting financially) But, they can’t be silenced forever. Those who have spoke out received death threats and threats of deportation as well as attacks from the christian community and being financial cut off. I feel like I will get stoned by the Christian community for speaking of what I know. My only motivation is for the protection of innocent victims. I hope that in the future, churches will see this horrific situation as an example of what zero accountability does and be much more careful about where they put there money and whom they blindly support. I hope that through this situation, hundred of other innocent children and youth will be protected. The Philippines may be a ‘don’t rock the boat’ culture, but that doesn’t explain why Tom hasn’t been listening to the chorus of voices telling him otherwise on the volume of evidence illustrating abuse and pointing towards Toto’s horrific character and disasters moral choices. Tom has hired some pretty fancy pancy, top-notch lawyers and he is well connected. If they are even remotely honest, they would not simply be “telling Tom what he wants to hear.” It’s Tom’s responsibility to at least attempt to get valid information. The victims and those speaking for justice have no money, no connections, and nothing to gain. The children are being represented by over-worked, underpaid, government prosecutors who are fighting against Tom’s well-paid private lawyers. Gee, I wonder who will “win.” But, this battle is not against flesh and blood. Honestly, I’m afraid for my life. It costs $250 to have someone murdered in the Philippines. I”m afraid that if I speak out, it will be me or someone I love. If anyone else out there knows the truth, please don’t let me stand alone is sharing it. I have so much more to share, but I’m afraid. This is not over. I imagine in years to come, or when Tom’s pockets dry up- there will be an outpouring of voices attesting to the shameful acts done at Sankey Samaritan Mission home. Some have already said “When Toto is unbailable, I will talk.” As long as Tom has money and Toto is lurking about the streets, much of the truth will remain hidden. And according to Tom’s recent tax records, he has over two million dollars of assets- this may take awhile. I’ve know a lot of missionaries and Christian workers. But, I’ve never know one with that much money. If you want to know the truth, follow the money trail. It’s disgusting."

An additional note by someone close to the situation: "The military is now using the closed Sankey compound as a base for training- a clear message that they are on Toto's side, who still lives on compound."


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 11:49 am 
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Quote:
As long as Tom has money and Toto is lurking about the streets, much of the truth will remain hidden. And according to Tom’s recent tax records, he has over two million dollars of assets- this may take awhile. I’ve know a lot of missionaries and Christian workers. But, I’ve never know one with that much money. If you want to know the truth, follow the money trail. It’s disgusting."


The concept that ALL missionaries are poor is not accurate. In PNG we had one who claimed he was a millionaire, he was also one of PNG's worst sex offenders and made no secret of it. Yet little was done about his offending.
This was the late 70s, so a million dollars back then would probably be worth more than Tom's 2 million today.
The concept that All missionaries are poor is a myth that is perpetrated to keep the donations rolling in.
There were also missionaries who were making significant sums of money by theft, misappropriation of money and exploitation of locals, MKs and their colleagues.

Money and bullying buys silence.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 1:59 pm 
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For the purpose of illustrating just how skewed a glowing, spiritual-sounding report from a missionary seeking to raise funds from gullible supporters can be, compare the following two documents.

The first is the report from the front lines in the Philippines, which I posted here in early December. This is what is really going on, in this scandalous cover-up of the abuse of young Filipinos in the Sankey Orphanage.

The second is Tom Randall's post from his own website, in the section called "Tom's Thoughts", which he wrote this past August.

Raz wrote:
Just this morning I have been alerted to a long comment posted in response to the blogpost I linked here two months ago.

It is full of insight and information. Those of you following the Tom Randall Orphanage case in the Philippines will want to read this. It is comment #11, posted on Nov. 23 by "Megan".

http://michaelnewnham.com/?p=19454

"Getting the truth out to prove that Tom Randall is not being honest is not easy because he is going to great efforts to cover it up. He is actually very motivated to lie as the truth will destroy him. To think that abuse has been going on in his orphanage for years, by the man whom he gave 100% power and trust to and by Toto’s son, whom Tom also views as a son. There was no system of checks and balances- Tom, Toto, and Jake were accountable to Tom, Toto, and Jake. At this point few have said things against Tom, just Toto and Jake. It’s not Tom’s character is question, it’s Toto and Jakes (and in my opinion, the character of all those who did stand silent and still are now) Those who strongly defend Tom should ask themselves if they know Toto and Jake well enough to vouch so strongly for them. It’s not ironic that the churches in the philippines have NOT come out in support of Toto, Jake, or Tom (with the exception of the few receiving huge amounts of money from Tom). The people of Lucena know Toto is a creep. That’s no secret. When numerous people, including victims, came to Tom for help, he silenced them. There were 5 victims ready to testify of abuse that day in court. Who is listening to them? Has any of Tom’s supported asked the victims who have escaped from the mission home what was really going on there? To find the truth, one must consider talking to people NOT on Tom’s pay role. Many are benefiting by keeping silent. Payment for silences is disguised as “donations to help the children and their families” and sometimes distributed the a local church in Lucena (yes, the pastor is in on it and also benefiting financially) But, they can’t be silenced forever. Those who have spoke out received death threats and threats of deportation as well as attacks from the christian community and being financial cut off. I feel like I will get stoned by the Christian community for speaking of what I know. My only motivation is for the protection of innocent victims. I hope that in the future, churches will see this horrific situation as an example of what zero accountability does and be much more careful about where they put there money and whom they blindly support. I hope that through this situation, hundred of other innocent children and youth will be protected. The Philippines may be a ‘don’t rock the boat’ culture, but that doesn’t explain why Tom hasn’t been listening to the chorus of voices telling him otherwise on the volume of evidence illustrating abuse and pointing towards Toto’s horrific character and disasters moral choices. Tom has hired some pretty fancy pancy, top-notch lawyers and he is well connected. If they are even remotely honest, they would not simply be “telling Tom what he wants to hear.” It’s Tom’s responsibility to at least attempt to get valid information. The victims and those speaking for justice have no money, no connections, and nothing to gain. The children are being represented by over-worked, underpaid, government prosecutors who are fighting against Tom’s well-paid private lawyers. Gee, I wonder who will “win.” But, this battle is not against flesh and blood. Honestly, I’m afraid for my life. It costs $250 to have someone murdered in the Philippines. I”m afraid that if I speak out, it will be me or someone I love. If anyone else out there knows the truth, please don’t let me stand alone is sharing it. I have so much more to share, but I’m afraid. This is not over. I imagine in years to come, or when Tom’s pockets dry up- there will be an outpouring of voices attesting to the shameful acts done at Sankey Samaritan Mission home. Some have already said “When Toto is unbailable, I will talk.” As long as Tom has money and Toto is lurking about the streets, much of the truth will remain hidden. And according to Tom’s recent tax records, he has over two million dollars of assets- this may take awhile. I’ve know a lot of missionaries and Christian workers. But, I’ve never know one with that much money. If you want to know the truth, follow the money trail. It’s disgusting."

An additional note by someone close to the situation: "The military is now using the closed Sankey compound as a base for training- a clear message that they are on Toto's side, who still lives on compound."


***********************

http://www.tomrandall.org/

“I want you to know, brothers that what has happened to me has

really served to advance the gospel…”

Philippians 1:12


August 2014

Dear Friends,

During my arrest I was questioned by both the Philippines’ NBI and the US Homeland Security agents. They both told me that my life, reputation, ministry, and further support for World Harvest Ministries was finished.

We thank God they were mistaken! Because of God’s Grace I saw inmates and family members, guards, and lawyers come to Christ. Being falsely charged, arrested, and told your service for the Lord is over was very troubling. But experiencing the power of the Holy Spirit in my cell where hopelessness and despair are the typical moods illustrated the excitement and joy that comes when you trust God and not man! When God’s word goes out it shall not return empty and shall accomplish His purpose! I wasn’t the only one to experience this. While in custody and waiting to be released to come home our kids led 39 teenage women to Christ!

“For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts. For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven and do not return there but water the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth, it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and shall succeed in the thing for which I sent it.” Isiah 55:9-11

After my release from jail and my return to the US I have had strangers approach me daily. They greet me in airports, on golf courses, at restaurants, stores, at the barber shop, gas stations, or riding my bike. After a quick hug they express their joy in seeing me free and how they prayed for me and how their church or cell group prayed as well! I ask them how they recognize me and many say it is the gap in my teeth they see when I smile! So despite our difficulties God is using our arrest to advance the Gospel and encourage others just as He promised. (Philippians 1:12, Isaiah 55:9-11, I Corinthians 15:55).

I shared a golf cart with a man in Florida who requested to play golf with me because he had heard and followed my story. He asked why I would still believe in a God that would allow me to be in prison unjustly. Several hours later he gave his life to Christ on the 13th tee! What has happened to me is advancing the Gospel! (Philippians 1:12)

In August two men and four women from our orphanages will go out as World Harvest Ministries missionaries to needy areas in the Philippines! Others have returned to school and continue to grow and share their faith stories.

After the agents’ dire predictions and 22 days in prison it is ironic that World Harvest has been more productive and fruitful than ever! Toto and the boys from Sankey just finished building a church in Mauban that was started by our Australian co-workers and our basketball outreach. In the typhoon stricken area, Tacloban, we purchased land and built a ministry center. Christian doctors and medical teams treat people, building teams and evangelism teams do outreach from there, it provides housing for the volunteers, and it is church on Sundays! This is being accomplished alongside Kid’s International Ministries. Our trucks take food and supplies from both Mindanao in the south and from Manila in the north to the central Philippines to the typhoon destruction area with over 2 million meals and counting. But more importantly, they take the Good News of salvation and a new life in Christ.

Men do not decide when God is finished with us! So I rejoiced when we made the final payment on a women’s home that is housing 35 girls in Manila. These girls are being discipled and encouraged by a young lady named Josie Long. We call the girls Josie’s Angels! Some of these girls are going out as missionaries this month!

My recent experience in jail has taught me not to rely on the word of men but on the promises of God! We experienced the painful consequences of people’s slander and saw our kids’ lives blown up. We cannot imagine what you thought when I was arrested and portrayed as one who would traffic children. But thank you for praying for my release and safety. Thank you for your generous financial support that has produced fruitful ministry since that painful and dangerous incident. We believe God is using my time in jail to advance the Gospel of Jesus Christ and we will continue to take His Word and trust it will always fulfill His purpose!

“You shall not go around as a slanderer among your people, and you shall not stand up against the life of your neighbor; I am the Lord.” Leviticus 19:16

Your grateful missionaries,

Tom and Karen Randall


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:05 pm 
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Translation: "Let's not talk about the children who were raped and molested by men who claimed to be God's servants. Let's just focus in the guy in the golf cart who got saved on the 13th tee!"

:x


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 3:46 pm 
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Exactly! And the gullible will believe this nonsense that so many were saved and homes are being set up, because they want to believe in a hero and have been made to feel guilty for ever doubting their hero and not doing heroic acts themselves.

Meanwhile the victims in all this mess are of little interest to the faithful and will hardly get a mention, they never do.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2015 12:48 pm 
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Anchored, here is another thread where we discussed the Tom Randall debacle.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2015 4:12 pm 
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Money talks in Christian organisations and sorry to say churches as well, always has and always will, I am not saying all of them so no high horses need comment. Full stop.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 9:19 am 
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Some of you will remember this case from the Philippines, not NTM-related.

Here is what appears to be the final chapter in this case of abuse and cover-up in an "orphanage" in the Philippines. Tom Randall refused to acknowledge that his Filipino administrator and the administrator's son had been abusing the young people in the home, and instead turned on his American missionary friend who tried to alert him to the abuse.

This is a summary written by that friend, Joe Mauk.

Accepting A Conclusion
Joe Mauk·
Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Three weeks ago I watched the movie “Spotlight” on our cable channel. I highly recommend it. This month is three years since we first received reports of abuse happening at a children’s home here in the Philippines. The showing of the movie coincided with me receiving news that the victims who had so far been appearing in court have decided to not push the continuation of the trial. The understandable reasoning for this is detailed in my review below. It was good timing to see the movie as the real victory there was the increased awareness which stimulated some changes in institutional procedures. Actual legal convictions were rare, as they still are. In that spirit and hope, we publish here a review I did for interested parties last July after meeting with the victims and their legal representation. Mission leaders and churches that support mission ministries would do well to learn from the mistakes we saw committed in the handling of these reports.

July 2016 Review of 2013 Reported Sexual Abuse Case at Children’s Home
Rev. Joseph C. Mauk

We have come to an assessment point of the abuse case we were involved in reporting at the end of 2013. I will review concisely from the beginning so as to provide, for those not yet aware, a flow of events up to the present time.

In late October, 2013, my youngest daughter received a verbal report from one of the teachers at the children’s home that she had been told by two of the girls at the home of being forcibly kissed by the administrator of the home. It should be noted that at this point, the children at the home were young men and women (32 total) ranging in age from 17-23 with one 11-year old boy as well.

I asked if they could get me something in writing so that I could send the report to the director of the mission sponsoring the home who was also my good friend, a ministry partner for many years and the chairman of the board of my company. My company is involved in managing the operations and assisting in the development of Christian conference centers in the Philippines. The two girls, because of close monitoring of all activities by the administrator and his staff, smuggled letters out to the teacher so she could provide them to us. This was at considerable personal risk because all of the young people had been required to sign contracts agreeing to not share anything negative about the children’s home to anyone outside or inside of the operation of the home.

Having received these letters, I immediately scanned them and emailed them to my friend, the director of the mission sponsoring the home. His response was for me to let him handle it. He said he had received such reports before and that he would be arriving in the Philippines in five weeks to handle the situation. I had worked with this friend many times in the past in handling administrative problems so I assumed this would be handled properly as well.

While waiting for his arrival we received word from the girls at the home that the two letter-writers were brought by two female staff to a private room and badgered by the staff until compelled to write a retraction of their letters. We also received word that a man was being allowed into the girls’ dorm at night. My company was providing security for the home as a service to my friend’s mission so I immediately arranged to change the security guards assigned at the home and to include lady guards to provide specific security for the girls’ dormitory. This attempted replacement was fiercely fought by the administrator, who called the mission director in the US who, surprisingly, also opposed a change of the security guards. We made our case quite strongly and the change was allowed but three days later the mission director authorized the administrator to change security agencies and most of the prior guards were re-hired by the new agency and assigned to the home. We discovered that over the years these guards had been selected by the administrator and were either relatives of his or personal friends from the area. (Also the official board of the home by this time, although previously independent of administration, had devolved into consisting of the administrator, his wife, his son, and two employees paid by the administrator.)

When the mission director arrived in the Philippines he did not engage in a normal investigation of such matters nor did he call me in, as usual, to assist him in the problem. He met with those involved and gave warnings not to spread rumors and bad information about the home or its administration. When he met with the teacher who had received the first reports, my daughter went with her and they met at a restaurant in a public mall. The mission director would not allow my daughter to sit with the teacher as he talked with her. (Incidentally, the mission director had performed the wedding of this same daughter of mine just six months before in California.) He took out a yellow legal pad and informed the teacher that he was taking notes of their discussion. She said okay and placed her cell phone on the table in recording mode. For 90 minutes he lectured her on not going to extremes about such issues, how bad I and my family was for making an issue of this and, at the end, offered her “an unrecorded cash advance” if she would just come back quietly to work. This she refused. About this time my daughter and her husband came back to the discussion as things were wrapping up. As they were concluding and saying good-byes the director moved to give my daughter a hug. When he noted refusal of such he went into a rant as to how she needed to stay out of this or she and her whole family (meaning me) would be deported from the Philippines and did she want this to happen? My daughter’s husband also had his cell phone on record mode at this time. Although the mission director subsequently and up till now denies any wrongdoing on the part of the administrator of the home, in his conversation with the teacher he not only said he believed that the administrator had done what the girls claimed, he also said he had “fired” the administrator, which actually never did happen.

After meeting with the teacher, the director called me on a Saturday to arrange a meeting with me some distance from my residence. Unfortunately, I was ill with diarrhea that day and said I couldn’t travel but could meet him the next week. He asked if I was open to email correspondence. I said yes. On the following Monday I received an email from him resigning from my board and cutting off any association or further communication with him.

At this point it became quite obvious that no serious investigation or proper treatment of the abuse complaints would happen. At the same time additional reports began to be received by us that much more severe abuse was happening to the young men at the home. This was being perpetrated in the past and up to the present by up to three male pedophiles who were former and present employees of the home and one of whom was the adult son of the children’s home administrator. We then understood why, when we attempted to replace the security guards, the staff ran and blocked the entrances to the boys’ dorm and let no one in and out at that time although the girls’ dorm was left unblocked and my daughter and the teacher were able to talk freely with the girls about the guard transition taking place. All of my five daughters have been professionally trained in spotting and reporting sexual abuse through their career training. Four of the five are here in the Philippines and they sought a way to report this ongoing cover up of abuse to authorities. This culminated in a raid by the NBI (Philippine National Bureau of Investigation, equivalent to the American FBI) in January of 2014. The American mission director was still present at the time and was taken into custody along with the home administrator and his son.

The rescued young people were all interviewed by the NBI and nine made sworn statements before a judge. These sworn statements then formed the basis for charges. The mission director inaugurated an intense defense by means of a rather extensive support network including social media and political connections. He was released without charges after 22 days. One NBI source said that, under Philippine law, he could have only been charged with negligence as the main funder of the operation, with a penalty of 20 days, so they were basically happy with the time of detention for him. For the administrator and his son, the statements made were more serious. Against the son, charges of rape were filed which are normally unbailable. For the administrator himself the charges were lasciviousness and thus less serious. However, the court set bail for the administrator at 540,000 pesos and the son at 380,000 pesos ($13,000 and $9,000 respectively) indicating the court looked at the administrator as a more dangerous threat than the son, even though the formal charges were less. The NBI and the court fully expected the accused to be jailed from time of arrest and throughout the entire trial process. The salary for a worker making minimum wage in the Philippines is about $3,000/year. But the entire bail was paid immediately in cash by the wife of the administrator. This payment of bail changed the whole dynamic of normal process. This was typical of someone from a wealthy family or some high-level figure working for a crime syndicate. The case was immediately passed from the Manila court to the regional court in Lucena City for it to play out there.

So, in the Philippines (as elsewhere), once money comes into the picture, the advantage goes to the perpetrators. If no one shows up in court to testify, the case is dismissed. That can often be arranged. Or if they show up, there are ways to perpetually delay so that it is a tremendous hassle to keep showing up. If the witnesses don’t show up, even one time, the case is dismissed.

In our case, the first hearing was a set-up. None of the witnesses were given notice and the hearing was taking place with the administrator grinning from ear to ear knowing the case was about to be dismissed. But a lady missionary who works with other abuse cases happened to be in court that day, heard this case being called and the names of the witnesses not present. She had just met with some of them the day before and immediately called the attention of the prosecutor and judge that no notice had been given to the witnesses. So the judge re-scheduled for three weeks later, the missionary let us know, we let the witnesses know and 11 victims and supporters were there three weeks later. The defense had filed a motion to quash the case on the basis of illegal arrest, improper jurisdiction, etc. The hearing proceeded with the NBI agent who did the arrests testifying to the legal basis. The judge, seeing the witnesses stand up when their names were read, ruled for the attorneys to submit their final arguments in writing within 90 days for his decision to be made. Interestingly, at the same time the judge was announcing his decision to require written final arguments, the mission director in the US and the pastor of his megachurch were announcing all the charges had been dropped and the entire raid ruled unjustified. Somehow that made us think there were some prior arrangements made (before the judge saw the real live victims!). Consequently, the motion to quash was denied when the judge gave his ruling four or five months later. The defense filed an appeal with the Court of Appeals but so far the trial has been allowed to proceed. After the first near fiasco, I hired private legal representation by request of the victims so that nothing should proceed without notification. It has been two and a half years since the arrests (note: this review was written in July, 2016) -and the actual trial was due to start last June 15, 2016. Again, no notices were sent, not even to the private law firm registered with the court to represent the victims, the defense attorneys pled for dismissal, but I had obtained a tentative schedule personally from the clerk of the court in March and was there with another advocate just in case it was proceeding. We were able to inform the court, once again, no notices had been given. Three more dates have been set for trial continuation in August, October and November.

To bring us up to date. Last week the remaining victims willing yet to testify met with their attorney to see what the future of the case looks like. It is good to remember, although the children’s home was often called an “orphanage”, that the children were not truly orphans, very poor and disadvantaged, even abused, but they had family. After the release of the young people (minors remained in social services custody but almost all were of age to be released) there was a great effort by the mission director and the former staff (with continued influence of the former administrator) to re-gather all the young people under their umbrella. They were promised college education (most were already enrolled in college but were told it would not continue to be paid for without their cooperation). They were promised vehicles, jobs, health care for parents etc., in return for staying part of the “family” and not saying any bad things. A few refused and have established independent lifestyles and a great deal of personal success. So far they are still willing to testify in court. But even on them the pressure is great. They are promised jobs and lifetime security, “just don’t testify in court, it’s the Christian thing to let it go”. The sponsors have provided tickets to visit family in distant locations, “coincidentally” over the exact dates trial testimony is scheduled, etc.

Now to present reality as related to us by the private attorney. If at any time from this point on, the notified witnesses do not appear, the case will be dismissed. At the same time the defense can use many legally valid delaying tactics to stretch the trial over two years or more. (If the accused were in jail, they would not favor delaying the verdict!) The attorney of the victims feels, even with all of the delays and subterfuge a conviction would be quite possible. However, following a conviction, the defense (assuming the money keeps flowing) can file an appeal with the Court of Appeals. It takes at least five years for the Court of Appeals to review a case. So the attorney estimates 8-12 years before anyone would see jail time. This is a lot to ask of the witnesses! It explains why the wealthy and connected in the Philippines rarely see jail time. BTW, the former vice-president of the Philippines was just last week charged with corruption in court. His bail was set at about the same as the bail set for the son of the administrator of the children’s home but less than the bail set for the administrator of the home! Obviously the court thought the administrator of the children’s home was a serious and dangerous perpetrator when they set the bail. But, money talks, perpetrators walk.

The few victims remaining willing to testify are playing it by ear. The moment the case is dismissed, the bail money immediately goes into the hands of the administrator and the victims have been reluctant to have that happen. So it looks like the waiting game will go on a while longer. We may never see a conviction but what has happened due to the courage of the few victims willing to speak out, against great opposition, is as follows:

1. The children’s home was shut down. It was already operating without a license for the age group they had but was being tolerated. No longer.
2. The administrator and his son will never be able to have any institutional authority over children.
3. The young people, even the ones still under the mission support umbrella, testify to a much better life now than what they had before the raid.
4. The ones really free are flourishing in a way they could never imagine before.




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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 10:10 pm 
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Thank you for this update.
It is a terrible feeling to be deceived by a co-worker.
The evil side of money is clearly seen here.
Thankful that the movie Spotlight has encouraged someone else.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2016 9:28 am 
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Very discouraging and sad to think what the victims who want to testify have to go thru.
But the author displays a healthy attitude.
And that must be hard to do!


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