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NTM implementing recommendations

September 3rd, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

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  1. More Than Disgusted
    November 10th, 2010 at 08:40 | #1

    @Anonymous
    Embracing what new philosophy, Anonymous? Did NTM tell you that? And you are believing it? (I’m not trying to be mean, just realistic.)
    Wait til others *under* the new philosophy tell you how great it is. If they are still in NTM by that time. It’s not “historically” that NTM is telling those who question or comment that they are the problem….and kicking them out. It’s TODAY. TODAY. TODAY. Does anybody hear? Does anybody get it? Especially students who are just believing what they are told…..by these nice men…..the same ones who are abusing people on the side. “Oh, I just can’t believe it, they are so nice.”
    Right, MKs? You know too well what it feels like to hear this and know the reality at the same time. Why are we worrying about protecting the “nice people” (on the forum thread) instead of speaking up for what really happened? What IS happening? Are we, too, protecting the abusers instead of speaking up for/as the victims?

  2. Anonymous
    November 6th, 2010 at 03:41 | #2

    @More Than Disgusted I fully agree with you, and I sincerely hope that Larry gets this as well. While it is great to see NTM embracing a new philosophy it does not negate the statistics that demonstrate that organizations (Both for-profit and non-profit) will not act quickly if they think they can “address” the situation without a negative impact on the organization. Sadly, this means that the victim is not viewed as a stakeholder but a threat to the organization. Consequently, it often results in half-hearted investigations, poor victim (Mission organizations use the term “member care”, and incomplete and inaccurate investigations. Furthermore in some organizations “whistleblowers” will not come forward if they feel it will jeopardize their standing with the organization. I have seen this over and over again in NTM. Parents hide things because they do not want to be the ones who bring up the 800 lb gorilla in the room. They have been taught that the lost souls they are reaching are far more important than family issues, and those who do have problems are the problem. Historically this means they will probably be sent home and ultimately kicked out.

    Victims rights should be protected as should the families of victims. NTM must stop viewing these people as “enemies of the gospel”. Include the Leadership on the field, and you will compromise your efforts. The EC is comprised of former FC, so NTM should strongly consider the effectiveness of involving the EC at all other than informing them that an investigation is being initiated. In reviewing this document, “leadership” is ill-defined. The document refers to EC, but it does not stipulate this in the table. Something to consider.

  3. More Than Disgusted
    November 4th, 2010 at 20:23 | #3

    Very good points, Anonymous.
    Just a few comments and questions.
    The EC, now the EB, either came up the ranks from the FCs or they were under leaders in US venues for a long time who come from the NTM way of thinking. How would you determine that they are not in collusion with the FCs?
    Most of what you say makes alot of sense. Until you get to the part where you seem to be trusting those at the top. How do you determine whether a corporation needs a total renovation from the inside out before putting trust in anyone?
    To repeat what has been said in many places on this blog and on the forums: These leaders are not NEW to NTM. Did abuses take place on their watch in other positions they had? Are abuses taking place TODAY under their watch in the corporation as a whole?
    So, where do you start?

  4. Anonymous
    November 4th, 2010 at 00:55 | #4

    So I may have missed this, but has anyone read the NTM-USA Child Protection Manual found here: http://www.ntm.org/news/pdf/ntm_usa_child_protect_manual.pdf

    I applaud their efforts, but as someone who spent the first years of my life on the mission field and now works in investigating sexual assault, harassment, and other forms of abuse I can tell you that reporting this to Leadership as the first step is the WRONG thing to do (See page 7 first point on “Investigation”. It was leadership in NTM and often leadership in the workplace that tries to cover this up and make it go away. They do not want the bad press. My advice? Take the leadership component out. In fact investigations should be conducted without the leadership (especially on the field) even knowing about it. Fail to do that and you have compromised your efforts. History demonstrates that field leadership covered this up time and time again. Larry, I cannot stress this enough!!! Do not bring leadership into investigating allegations on the field. The EC can and should know the basics but NOT the field committee.

  5. Observer
    October 11th, 2010 at 17:48 | #5

    @Tim Maia
    Hey – not much Christian in any of your responses.

  6. Tim Maia
    October 1st, 2010 at 00:19 | #6

    Are the phones in Sanford outfitted with the numbers 9-1-1? If not, would somebody who runs a “mission barrel” send HQ one of them thar’ new-fangled contraptions so they can report crimes to the proper authorities.

  7. Tuti Hess
    September 29th, 2010 at 13:13 | #7

    @Son of a survivor
    Thank you son of a survivor. I am one of the people you are talking about. I look at my kids and think what if that had happened to them. You better believe I would be doing all I could do to bring the creeps to justice, give help to other victims and see that future children are protected. At this moment in time I’m feeling helpless so I’ve gone mostly to prayer but also I’m not staying quiet when this issue comes up I’m making my voice heard. I’m feeling fatigued by it though so can’t imagine how hard it must be for those who have had to endure this for years, unbearable and overwhelming.

  8. Son of a survivor
    September 28th, 2010 at 11:55 | #8

    Please don’t underestimate the brokenness NTM members feel, having heard about these issues. I can’t speak to the attitude of every member; no one can. But in the areas where I am interacting with NTM members, I see continual heartache over this, and a resolve to see the mission handle this appropriately both now and in the future (prevention AND Biblical resolution).

    I see so many of these people giving sacrificially and voluntarily to the MK Fund, not from a sense of obligation or guilt but because they hurt for the survivors as they look at their own children, and imagine that travesty applied to their lives. I’ve seen a student prepare to step out from the training… not because he cannot accept NTM as it is and where it is going, but because he feels called to reach out to the MKs and their families, and show them God’s love as it should always have been shown.

    I guess what I’m trying to say is this: I see much reason for hope in the response of many current NTM members.

  9. Older Sister
    September 27th, 2010 at 22:27 | #9

    @Mar
    Every NTM member should be REQUIRED to read the GRACE report!!! In talking with a few of them, they don’t seem to realize just how evil, corrupt and vile these crimes were. Shame on them!

  10. Older Sister
    September 27th, 2010 at 22:23 | #10

    Sixteen of the personnel recommendations have been addressed and the
    remaining four are either waiting on GRACE to complete contacting personnel or are in process by the Executive Board. We expect to be able to complete action in regard to all 20 personnel by the end of September.
    This, latest from NTM

  11. Mar
    September 27th, 2010 at 19:22 | #11

    Your voices are being heard … I read all 68 pages of the report to honor you who should have been heard long ago

  12. Tim Maia
    September 16th, 2010 at 10:59 | #12

    @jdg
    I’m not waiting. I’m driving toward I-95 as we speak. If the liberal hippies could protest Vietnam, why can’t we protest in Sanford?

  13. dbarney
    September 16th, 2010 at 09:13 | #13

    @Denise Amstutz K.

    And the family members saying to let it lie are the ones that were abused themselves

  14. Tim Maia
    September 15th, 2010 at 14:24 | #14

    Quiz for NTM:
    If a woman is standing on the sidewalk at 1000 E. First St., screaming that someone stole her purse, you should:
    1) cross the street and drive away;
    2) accuse the woman of wearing a tight-fitting purse;
    3) hand her a copy of an old Brown Gold;
    4) invite her to Tuesday night fellowship;
    5) call the police;
    6) send Stan Donmoyer to do an investigation.

  15. Tim Maia
    September 15th, 2010 at 14:08 | #15

    @jdg
    Well, at 2:46 p.m., I’m sort of hoping the dude that started GRACE, Dr. T, Billy Graham’s relative, former Florida prosecutor, Liberty University law professor says to himself: “You know, these smart alec little MK’s apparently have done a little more in life than just fish and climb for coconuts. In fact, they might even have e-mail addresses/names like public@nytimes.com, or ombudsman@washpost.com, or Abdoulaye Gaye (Procureur général), or minjust@caoba.entelnet.bo, or minjust@caoba.entelnet.bo, or U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division ° Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS)
    1400 New York Avenue, 6th Floor ° Washington, D.C. 20530, or http://www.donotunderestimateourresolvetoseethismatterresolvedandthedeviantspunished.getagrip.mk. In fact, these smart alec MK’s might write letters, long involved letters like this: ‘Dear Dictatorial Despot/Democratically Elected Unsaved Person: It’s election year. The natives are restless. It’s always good to have a few heads on the platter to distract the natives. Please find attached a report from Billy Graham’s third favorite grandkid, for your weekend reading pleasure. Signed, smart alec MK.’” That might work, but I’m guessing Dr. T and Mr. T might actually get something done. But fret not. People close to me have been hurt. I will not go quietly into the night.

  16. Denise Amstutz K.
    September 15th, 2010 at 13:32 | #16

    @Tim Maia
    Thank you. That is why I have lost all hope in NTM, because they appologize for Fanda and do just enough recommendations to get “off the hook”. They say that they are changing things in their own organization but what about the lives that are around these bottom feeders now? Some of my family say to just let it lie, that it was so far in the past that it does not matter now what is done, that the victims should be the ones worried about lawsuits for slander, and on and on. It is all the same NTM rhetoric, just they have believed it for so long that they are now tape recorders just spouting off the “company line”. NTM does not want the names getting out to the general population. Their terminations have been confidentialialy made to only NTM members. My opinion is that they do not want some “outsider” to get pointed to the report and happen to read a name of a man that they have been attending church with, then they go to their children and start asking questions, all of the sudden victims from the years since start coming forward, then NTM has a problem. Right now it was just MKs that were abused. We are considered a casualty of reaching the lost. Not acceptable to all, but hey, more lost people are being reached even today, so lets ring our bell and get on with life. If civilian children in the US, who had no ties to NTM, came forward as victims because of NTM coverup, well, there would be no cross to hide behind then. The general public would not be so willing to forgive and move on just because another Tribal person accepted Christ. I know that God is pleased when someone comes to accept Him, but you had better believe He will not go on letting people commit horrific acts in His name. The coverup was just as criminal (to me) than the actual abuse, and when US victims start coming forward NTM may realize that, one would think.

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